FacebookSocial Media

What Does “BMS” Mean on Facebook?

what does bms mean on facebook

The internet has many acronyms and slang used, and it is hard to keep a tab on the meaning of each of them. Even more surprising is that one acronym can have various meanings depending on its context and use.

A popular term people see on various social media platforms is the “BMS” acronym.

The term is mostly used on Facebook and other social media platforms like Snapchat. This post has prepared a guide if you want to know what it means and how to use it.

Quick Answer

“BMS” is an acronym used, and it stands for “Broke My Scale”. In many instances, female celebrities and other Facebook users take photos of themselves and ask their followers and friends to rate their photos. When the acronym “BMS” is used, it means someone is beautiful, and the beauty cannot be rated on a scale of 1 to 10.

The “BMS” acronym is a common term used on many social media platforms. But if it is your first time encountering it, this guide might help you understand it better and how to use it. The guide has explained the origin of “BMS”, its meaning on Facebook, and how to use it on Facebook and other social media apps. If you are excited to keep learning about the term, please keep reading this post!

What is the Origin of “BMS”?

It is unclear where “BMS” originated from, but many believe it originated from Snapchat.

Initially, Snapchat was used for sexting, and its famous disappearing photos are where “BMS” was used.

On Snapchat, people can send photos and other snaps and ask their friends to rate them.

While users could have used the traditional scale to rate the posts, “BMS” was used to rate something beyond the maximum traditional scale.

What Does “BMS” Mean on Facebook?

“BMS” stands for “Broke My Scale”.

We all know the traditional way of rating people from 1 to 10, and “BMS” is a way of rating someone without using numbers.

It is normal to ask people to rate your photos on Facebook; when such happens, other people may use “BMS” instead of sticking to the traditional scale.

A person who comments “BMS” on your photo implies beauty that cannot be rated. “BMS” is a creative and cool way of appreciating someone’s photo, and it indicates the beauty is overwhelming and surpasses the highest rating.

How To Use “BMS” on Facebook

The term “BMS” is universal and not limited to any social media platform. Any platform like Facebook has specific conditions for its use if you want to use it. Because it is a positive acronym that indicates one’s beauty, you can use the “BMS” acronym instead of replying with gorgeous.

When someone asks you to rate them on Facebook, usually they would give a scale of 1 to 10. Instead of using the given scale, you can use “BMS” to imply the beauty is great and cannot be rated within the given scale. Although it may sound naughty, it is better than replying with beautiful.

When asked to rate your friend’s post on Facebook, you can use “BMS” in the comment section.

Moreover, if someone updates their profile picture, you can use the acronym when the photo is very beautiful. You must note that “BMS” is not limited to any social media platform but should be used for interaction alone.

Conclusion

Many terms are used on various social media platforms, and it is understandable not to know all of them.

If you have encountered “BMS” on Facebook and wondering what it means, this guide has explained its origin, what it means for Facebook and how you can use it.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is “BMS” offensive when used on Facebook?

No. When people use “BMS” to comment on your profile picture or photo, it indicates beauty that is beyond the highest scale given. “BMS” is a positive way of complimenting and representing other words like gorgeous.

Where can I use the acronym “BMS”?

“BMS” is a universal acronym and can be used in all social media platforms that require user interaction. All social media platforms that allow users to post their photos can use “BMS” to rate the photos.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Scroll to Top